Jon Wood (One Illustrator, Slightly Used)

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Posts tagged with "arting"

>spend all day on non-pretty art of humanized Rarity
>post it on depibooru
>it’s in the negatives within a few minutes

-

The funny thing is, all I’d have to do to make it “pretty” is to change her head and upper arms. That’s it. That’s about all it’d take.

escapekit:

SlatePro

The SlatePro is currently being offered to the public as part of a Kickstarter campaign with about two weeks remaining. If you’re interested in the project check out their Kickstarter page here.

>desk with laptop ventilation built in

Feb 1

why does it all have to be about money? Why can't it just be for the fun and passion of storytelling?

Anonymous

fauxboy:

oh yes, thats right, I forgot the world ran on fun. I’ll just be sure to fill up my gas tank with your patented Funbucks™!!

Shucks, it’s not like I want to be paid REAL LIFE MONEY for my time and skill. Nahhh, as long as I’m having fun who cares if I’m drawing with a stick in the mud of my new home in a ditch!! 

FUUUUUUUUUUUUNNNNNNNN

Above; a conversation between an artist and someone who has never spent significant effort on a creative endeavor in their entire life.

Or a moron.

Jane Sweetness: Sociopath in Menswear by Jon-Wood

"I like your smile. I think I’ll take it."

Outfit inspired by Florence Welch in the “Sweet Nothings” music video (NSFW), and Bertie Wooster.
Hair inspired by 20s hair, such as the above Helen Hayes publicity photo (which actually seems to be from 1934) and River Song’s hair in “The Time Of Angels”.
Cane based on Sebastian the Inquisitor from Babylon Five. It’s actually a lot fancier than I can show in this pic. And, I now realize, entirely too short. Unless Ms. Sweetness (a pseudonym given to her by the press) carries it entirely for intimidating purposes, which, given her previous exploits, is not exactly an unlikely possibility.

Lines of action: Note how Jane’s primary line (purple) is basically a right angle, with only one secondary line (blue), which leads the eye straight into the razor. Muttonchops has a much “weaker” main line (red), which comes from his slumping, cringing pose. I also gave him significantly more secondary lines (orange). This serves to contrast him with the much “neater” Jane.

His right arm leads straight into Jane’s secondary line, and his feet (including the spiderweb) point the eye towards Jane’s feet and legs, which pull you up her body to her face, back to Muttonchops’ face, down his body and too his feet etc.

Pop quiz: how much of all that do you think I did on purpose?

Colors: Since the most vibrant color in MC’s outfit is his purple smoking jacket/bathrobe (the blue of his pants and the jacket’s lining are secondary), I thought of his main color as purple. Jane’s is, obviously, red. Which is why the counterlighting is yellowish-green, because complementary colors.

Also, note the presence of more saturated colors on Jane overall, compared to Muttonchops. Even his skin is pale. I’m not sure why I chose purple for the shading. I was doing Jane’s eyeliner in black, and decided to change it to purple because whynot. Then I started doing her shading in that purple (sometimes on Multiply, usually at 50% or 70% opacity).

The green background sets off Jane’s red nicely, I think.

Sorry for the dry commentary, I’m feeling drained after getting ambushed by a cold yesterday.

Jan 7

underpriced, undervalued & over it: attitudes towards art & commissions

nightingales:

There is a really problematic culture of artists underpricing their commissions online - though I’m sure this practice extends towards the ‘real world’. A fun fact before we start: the internet is actually part of the ‘real world’. If you don’t think that industry artists are also underpaid and undervalued, then I’m not sure what to say to you and you should probably quit reading while you’re ahead.

Pricing low in and of itself, isolated from the context of the kind of expectations that accompany low pricing for artwork, is not really problematic. What IS problematic, what MAKES it problematic is the fact that (as far as my experiences and the experiences of artists I know have made clear to me):

  • People expect cheaply priced artwork to be the norm. 

This raises all kinds of issues:

Because of this belief, it is then only reasonable that people tend to strongly believe that appropriately priced work - and I am talking about when an artist decides to price themselves according to a standard minimum wage, while also accounting for their time, effort & level of skill - is actually overpriced. 

This lends credence to the very popular (and unfortunate) mindset that art is not a ‘real’ job. It is a real job. But you, as a client or a consumer, probably find it difficult to even entertain the notion it is a real job. Why? Because if you have ever bought artwork online or otherwise, you will have never paid for a piece as if it was the product of a ‘real’ job or service.

When worth and value in our society is tied so closely to money, how can you think art is a real job when what you pay does not even come close to approaching what you would pay others for a ‘real’ job, a ‘real’ skill, service, product (all of which art is?) You are even afforded a choice to continue to believe that art is not a real job. There might be one artist charging appropriately for their work, but hundreds of others aren’t. I doubt one in a sea of many is enough to convince you of the worth of art.

I feel artists charging so lowly for their work breeds an attitude of entitlement in clients. This manifests in the messages artists receive begging them to lower their prices, telling them their art isn’t worth x or y, showing shock at the extravagant amounts that artists ask for their work (‘extravagant’ often being ‘enough to buy one meal in return for six or seven hours of work’). It does not help that art is often marketed as ‘cheap’ therefore worth buying (‘you should commission this artist, their work is so cheap and affordable!’) versus the fact it is worth buying because it is beautiful, custom-made, one-of-a-kind, everything else that art is and can be.

It is absolutely demeaning and almost humiliating to be at the whims of clients who ask for a thousand changes to their commission, who are picky, fussy, disrespectful, and who are trying their utmost to get their money’s worth, when they have paid you $10. $10 for work that is already going to take you a good 3 or 4 hours, and then you have to spend MORE time on top of that dealing with their difficulties. The worst part is that most artists expect this. That this is the kind of client you must cater to when you’re working for $2 an hour (if you’re lucky). I know artists are terrified of raising prices because they fear they will lose clients, but are the literal scrooges of people the kind of client base you want to build?

Finally, don’t work for cheap people. It is widely agreed among artists that the majority of the time, the less a client pays, the less they respect you and the more they will dick you around. If somebody thinks that image, which I’d guess to be at least an hour or two’s work, isn’t worth paying the measley sum of $7, which is like, what, the price of a bowl of soup and a coffee at a cafe? They don’t value your work and are not worth working for.”

(source)

Then there are absolute illogicalities that arise in pricing due to the pressure of keeping prices low. Why on Earth, for example, is it that almost every single artist will charge less than double the amount for a piece that involves more than one character? Almost every artist I know has confessed that it is more difficult to draw two characters interacting in the same image than it would be for them to draw two entirely separate, singular characters in different images. And yet everyone charges 50% of the base price for an added character. How does that make sense?! It doesn’t. Think about it. I think this example speaks a lot about how art is valued (the fact that it isn’t).

The lack of appropriate monetary value assigned to art also makes it broadly valueless in other areas. There is this uncomfortable attitude that art is not a real job, that anyone can do it, that it is wrong for artists to profit off their own work, that it is wrong for artists to own their own work. Do you think I am being melodramatic?

This kind of unsettling, depressing culture is played out on Tumblr almost every day - artwork that is reposted, edited, unsourced. The deletion of artist comments because what we say about our own work doesn’t matter. We don’t matter. Art is only of value when it is divorced from its creator.

I don’t think people think a lot, or much, or at all about the process of creating artwork. Maybe if they did they would understand that there was a PERSON who poured some of their time, effort, and skill into it. I think people have some kind of disconnect between artwork/artist, as if artwork is produced separately from the artist. This is just a theory, but since I struggle to understand why some people are so adamantly against paying more than $20 for a piece of quality work, this is the best explanation I can come up with. I can understand, because if people think that art is separate from the artist, why bother paying the artist or giving credit to them? If they exist as separate entities, why even care?

I’m not suggesting that there are any quick-fixes to these kinds of problems. There isn’t. I’m not encouraging artists to raise their prices or people to pay more. Though both those things would be very nice, I don’t feel it really addresses the underlying issues. What came first, underpriced art or undervaluing art? Who knows.

I think people are in need of an attitude adjustment, more than anything. I think I would be far more comfortable with artists charging lower prices if people actually acted in a way where they realise that it is a privilege and not a right. That it is a privilege to be able to buy art, which is a LUXURY - it is not a right afforded to you. You do not have permission to act like a spoilt child because you cannot afford someone’s work. You do not have any right to assign arbitrary values to someone’s art according to your own ludicrous attitudes to the worth of art.

I would also be much more comfortable if I knew that all artists were also acutely aware of the culture of underpricing, especially so that they know that they do not have to put up with the poor attitudes that often accompany clients that pursue cheaply-advertised artwork. If these two things worked in tandem, I am pretty sure that everyone would have an easier time in regards to commissions.

Further Reading

Lots of artists have talked about art pricing, and I suggest these for further reading (especially as they complement & provide further understanding about the issues I’ve raised here):

And since I feel a lot of my gripes with underpriced artwork (and what artists have to put up with as a result of that) can be alleviated by manners, here are some articles on commission etiquette:

Dude, you are aware that women have different body types, expressions, and facial shapes, and can be drawn from other angles than 3/4?

(To be fair, they do have a few slightly more diverse pieces. A few. And I say this as someone who also had 3/4 Pelvic Thrust disease.)

Dec 1

hard-in-hightown:

honeyrisuke:

a-little-cleverer:

artbymoga:

All of the above were things I was asked/told in the past week.

You forgot the “Is that anime?” one. 

oh, and “is that you?”

Or “Who is that?”

I once had a rather curvacious girl ask me if I could draw her while we were both waiting for our orders at a takeout. My befuddled response was “I only draw cartoons”.

I really wish someone had issued me a device, at age 13, that would go “SHE’S HITTING ON YOU, SHERLOCK” on appropriate occasions. It would’ve simplified matters.

rocket hamster by Jon-Wood
I created an HD version of one of my favorite pieces. Prints available from deviantART. Or in real life, in the unlikely event you know me personally.
It’s funny how easy this was. i used Shape layers, and happen to have the PSD on my hard drive after I recently retrieved my files our old computer’s backup, so all I had to do was Ctrl+Click on the layer mask, go into the Paths pane, hit the Convert Selection to Path, add the path as a vector mask to the layer by hitting the little grey thing with the white circle in the Layers pane, and then spend a half-hour fixing the hash it makes.
It takes a few seconds per layer, really. As opposed to vector-tracing Celir, which I cannot find the original of to save my life, forcing me to go manual.. Interestingly, Illustrator’s Livetrace, which you’d think would be ideal, makes a complete mess of the image.
Still, I like seeing low-res blurs transformed into crisp vectors. I wonder if this is how George Lucas felt.

rocket hamster by Jon-Wood

I created an HD version of one of my favorite pieces. Prints available from deviantART. Or in real life, in the unlikely event you know me personally.

It’s funny how easy this was. i used Shape layers, and happen to have the PSD on my hard drive after I recently retrieved my files our old computer’s backup, so all I had to do was Ctrl+Click on the layer mask, go into the Paths pane, hit the Convert Selection to Path, add the path as a vector mask to the layer by hitting the little grey thing with the white circle in the Layers pane, and then spend a half-hour fixing the hash it makes.

It takes a few seconds per layer, really. As opposed to vector-tracing Celir, which I cannot find the original of to save my life, forcing me to go manual.. Interestingly, Illustrator’s Livetrace, which you’d think would be ideal, makes a complete mess of the image.

Still, I like seeing low-res blurs transformed into crisp vectors. I wonder if this is how George Lucas felt.

Describe my art style to me

ragtimelime:

kaisinel:

I dont usually do these, but im pretty curious, considering I have difficulty describing/defining my own style.

I don’t really know if my style is consistent enough

Me neither. I have about five or six different styles. I used to joke on DA that I had discovered a new style, again, every time I came up with a new one. Some were less viable than others.

(Source: scaryjokes)

oxboxer:

Verrik. Commission!

Maybe I should stop drawing these tall and narrow so I don’t have to a)suffer thru Tumblr resizing or b)find workarounds to the resizing. Or maybe instead of ME adapting to the SYSTEM, the SYSTEM should adapt to ME!!! ROAR

Or you could just use the Slice tool to save it as two separate images, then immediately delete said slice from the PSD.

Protip?